Monday, April 25, 2011

Lesson Learned: Using and Letting Go of Lecturing

My 100-level students are currently reading and writing about the future. I've been depressing them with apocalyptic and dystopic visions of our world, starting with Fahrenheit 451 and ending with the short films at Don't worry, there were some essays in between, like if Google is making us stupidwhy we love robots, or how living longer impacts our morality. Yup, it's been a real happy time over the past two months, culminating in the creation of a persuasive essay on their vision of the future.

Taking comPOSITION's advice, I used for brainstorming ideas about the essay and then about how they thought they could best persuade their audience about their vision for the future. I have to say, I was blown away by the results (which you can see here). They all not only had clear ideas about the future, but they also had clear ideas about how to write their essay. I had nothing to add. Class dismissed.

If I had done the same thing in the classroom, I know I wouldn't have received half the answers that are now living on corkboard. Because it is anonymous and spontaneous, students were free to try, fail, and post again. Usually I write their answers on the board, but they have to be willing to share them. Usually, they just wait for me to give them the answer. And, seeing as how I can't stand silences, I'll answer the question myself. But this experience has really forced me to realize that I don't need to lecture as much as I do, and in fact I am potentially wasting my students' (and my) time by telling them things they already know. 

This is not a minor revelation. I've now realized that over the summer I need to find a way to more fully incorporate corkboard, twitter, blogs, and other social media tools in order to not just engage my students, but get an accurate snapshot of what they know so I can spend my time on things they don't. It allows me to finally turn my classroom into a more dynamic space of give and take between myself and the students. The challenge becomes when I don't have regular or consistent access to a computer lab in order to use these technologies. 

Thankfully, I have all summer to figure this out. And while I knew I lectured too much, I don't think the practical reality of that knowledge really influenced how I approached teaching. So, thank you for making me reexamine my teaching and ultimately improving my approach to the classroom. 

I guess you can teach an old dog new tricks after all.

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