Tuesday, March 29, 2011

The Standardization of Higher Education = #FAIL

I was at an institutionally-mandated get-together for those instructors who taught the various developmental classes (math, reading, writing) at our institution a few weeks ago. We were hearing about the educational technology the math department was using to get students up to college readiness when the instructor presenting told us a disturbing little anecdote about how she caught a cheater last semester. "It was just like Big Brother!" she exclaimed excitedly. Ugh.

Now, I've already voiced my thoughts about our over-reliance on ed tech as the savior of education, but this statement made me think about one of the unintended (or intended) consequences of the move to standardize higher education, heavily facilitated by educational technology: the constant monitoring of all activity of both instructor and student. If we can standardize and record every instance of learning in a student's academic career, then we can certainly pinpoint where learning failed, exactly which teacher or advisor is responsible for derailing a student's career.

The more we standardize, the more we continue to infantilize our students and undermine our faculty. We are basically telling students that they aren't responsible enough to learn and professors can't be trusted to teach. Think about that for a second. Students can't learn, and we can't teach, so you need to be constantly monitored to make sure that these things happen.

How does this move towards standardization and assessment actually help students? What happens when institutions and accrediting boards rigidly dictate when and where learning happens in higher education? When instead of facilitating "informal" moments of learning, the university is required/requiring rigid reporting/return on investment data on campus talks, meeting spaces, and optional (but really mandatory) activities? Or that students (and eventually instructors/professors) measure success exclusively through test scores?

How do we teach and learn through experience, experiment, trial and error, and failures when Big Brother is always watching us? Does $44 billion really buy the Federal government the right to dictate to us how and what we teach, or how and when students can learn? As I put in the comments of Mary Churchill's post "Can We Afford to Play,"

As we discover with young kids, we can spend all the money we want, but at the end of the day, all they want to play with is the empty cardboard box. I think the same thing goes for higher education, especially on the side of the professors. If professors didn't have to worry as much about constant accountability measures, measurable outcomes, and reporting, we might be more likely to relax along with the students. If more people in front of the classroom had job security and more time, they may be more invested in the students outside of the classroom. If it didn't feel like Big Brother was constantly monitoring all of us, we might relax, let loose, and really, really, learn.
At a certain point, the institution needs to get out of the way and just let learning happen. I have been critical of the type of "leisure" that takes place on (or rather off) campus, but is this behavior a result of the high states, high pressure environment we've created on campus? Most faculty and students can't wait to get off campus at the end of the day; why is that? Universities have invested billions in creating "spaces" for students, faculty, and sometimes even community. Some have been very successful, but I wonder how many of them developed organically, and how many of them were responses to accreditation board requirements (having gone through two at two different universities, this is an important component for any re-accreditation)?

We may end up passing whatever tests they put in front of us, delivering more mandated content in increasingly rigid ways, but at the end of the day, we have failed.

1 comment:

  1. I teach part of my assignment in a basic skills lab where we have math and English students sitting side-by-side and working on assignments. What I have noticed over the years is that our software has gotten "better" by keeping out students occupied longer. When I first started working in the lab, I would assist both math and English students and I always had to adjust my teaching and explanations to the students who came to me. The problems they were having were often related to deeper issues that could only be addressed by getting to know them a little. That does not happen nearly as often. They, instead, plugged in and on task.


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